KIT Materials Center

Welcome to the KIT Center Materials in Technical and Life Sciences

The challenges of the digital economy of the 21st century in the context of the forth industrial revolution require a constant development of new materials to enable new and challenging applications. The KIT Center Materials in Technical and Life Sciences integrates KIT research groups from the natural sciences, engineering and life sciences, which share a common interest in material research and in the development of new materials. The close cooperation between scientists from different disciplines creates a great potential for leading edge research in material sciences. The technological development requires continuous research into and development of new efficient materials for specific applications. In the KIT Materials Center, new materials and technologies are developed in a closed chain, from basic research to economic implementation, thanks to the integration of basic and application-oriented research. The development of nanostructured materials as well as the development of environmentally friendly technologies play a special role in the KIT Center. Furthermore, the integration of information-based approaches and modeling in the context of the digitalization of material sciences plays a growing, and increasingly important, role.

The work of the KIT Materials Center covers five topics:

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Highlights


News

Operando X-ray spectroscopy shows what happens in each single part of a working catalyst. (Photo: Dr. Dmitry Doronkin, KIT)
Three-dimensional View of Catalysts in Action
Thanks to its flexibility and adhesion, the biodegradable display can be worn directly on the hand. (Photo: Manuel Pietsch, KIT)
Biodegradable Displays for Sustainable Electronics
A platinum/palladium noble metal block, the atoms, and deposition of a platinum cluster on cerium oxide that acts as efficient catalyst. (Image: ITCP/KIT)
How to Make Catalysts More Efficient
Aerobuster invented by Thomas Blank, Horst Hahn, Jochen Kriegseis, and Martin Limbach (from the left) guarantees virus-free air in the waiting area. (Photo: Markus Breig, KIT)
Aerobuster Hunts for Corona Viruses
NMR probe (left) with miniaturized detector (right). In HiSCORE, such detectors will be combined with hyperpolarization to acquire binding processes of substance candidates. (Photos: Markus Breig, KIT)
Drug Screening at Far Higher Throughput
In vivo images of growing artery (A, B) and confocal images of arterial blood flow and arterial endothelial actin cytoskeleton (C, D). Detailed caption at the end of the text. (Images: ZOO, KIT)
Specific and Rapid Expansion of Blood Vessels
Electron micrograph of the “empty” scaffold (without hydrogel) that an international research team used to deform individual cells. Marc Hippler, KIT
“Stretching Rack” for Cells
Sevda Abadpour and Axel Diewald from KIT’s Institute of Radio Frequency Engineering and Electronics (IHE) place a chip onto a board. Components in the micrometer range have to be aligned perfectly. Joachim Hebeler, KIT
Development of Highly Compact Radar Sensors for Industry
Schematic representation of a noble metal catalyst with inactive single atoms (left) and active clusters (right; noble metal: white; carrier metal: yellow; oxygen: red). Florian Maurer, KIT
Noble Metal Clusters Can Enhance Performance of Catalysts and Save Resources
Color change: The right microcylinder printed with the novel photoresist appears white, because light is scattered in its sponge-like structure, whereas the cylinder printed with conventional photoresist appears transparent. 3DMM2O
Novel Photoresist Enables 3D Printing of Smallest Porous Structures
Cover KIT
Advanced Materials (Wiley/VCH) Special KIT-Issue

"Multidisciplinary Materials Research at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)"

The KIT Special Issue contains a total of 27 publications by scientists from the KIT Materials Center, on a broad range of topics.

available online
Zeitschriften
News Archive